Clogged Pipes

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Clogged Pipes

Why Does My Kitchen Sink Smell? It Could Be One of These 4 Causes

Why Does My Sink Smell? It is not uncommon for homeowners to encounter unpleasant odors in their household sinks or water, and when they do, they want to go to the source of the problem and find out what is causing their water or sinks to smell unpleasant. If you are experiencing an unpleasant odor in all of your water faucets, then you most likely have a problem with the main water supply. On the other hand, if the smell is only coming from certain faucets, the problem is probably located in the fixtures or pipes involved in those specific faucets.   Does Your Sink Smell Like Rotten Eggs or Sewage? If you are experiencing a rotten egg (sulfurous) or sewage-like odor in certain sinks, it is likely a result of bacterial activity, which can be caused by bacteria growth inside the drain: This is the most common cause behind

4 Tips For Plumbing Vent Odor Control

When you go outside, do you notice a foul odor in your yard? Maybe you don’t have a dog, so the odor problems must be something else. Those offensive odors may be coming from your plumbing vent, or sewer vent/vent stack, which is a vent pipe for your septic system or plumbing system, to help divert wastewater and septic tank odors. Plumbing vents are important; these plumbing vent stacks and plumbing vent pipes (often PVC pipe, but can be other materials) allow sewer gases to slowly escape from the septic system of a home, so these sewer gases from solids and liquids, hydrogen sulfide, or other septic/unpleasant odors can vent up through your septic vent pipe; allowing those sewer gas odors to be released into the atmosphere and taken away by the wind currents. This process ensures that a home’s pipes aren’t under too much pressure – the effects of

Effects of Clogged Plumbing Vents

As a homeowner, it’s inevitable that you’re going to deal with plumbing issues every now and then. If you’re like most people, you have a pretty good idea what’s wrong when the bathroom sink clogs (likely culprits hair and soap scum), or when the kitchen sink clogs (grease, debris, food scum). However, there’s a lesser-known cause of some plumbing problems, and it’s sitting on top of your house right now: it’s called a “plumbing vent.” Plumbing vents are situated on the roof of homes, with the 2 to 3-inch pipe extending upwards. The purpose of this pipe is to allow air into the drainage system. The problem is that when this vent gets blocked, the blockage can cause the flow of water to slow down, or stop, and then foul smelling sewer gasses can enter the home. Blockages Create ‘Negative’ Pressure When this vent gets blocked, the flow of water

How Do You Unclog a Drain With a Septic System?

Clogged drains are a common problem, but they can often be resolved without calling in a professional. What’s more, you don’t need to use toxic chemicals to clear out your clog. With a little patience and some tried and true methods, you can often unclog your drain by yourself, in a reasonably short amount of time.  If you are a homeowner with a septic tank, there may be other considerations you need to look at when removing blockages in your septic system, so that back up doesn’t negatively affect your septic tank, or cause issues with septic tank pumping or solid wastes in the septic tank. First, try to physically remove what’s causing the problem. One common cause of clogs is hair collected around a pop-up stopper or strainer. You may be able to perform drain cleaning and remove the hair and clear the drain clog, or you might be

How to Unclog a Drain Without Drano

Drains can, and will, become clogged throughout the daily usage that homeowners and their families place on the drains and plumbing system of the home. When blockages occur, whether in the kitchen sink, bathroom sink, tub drain or shower drain, garbage disposal or any sink drain with stubborn clogs, backups or even a slow drain issue, there are other solutions than immediately turning to chemical drain cleaners like Drano or Liquid Plumber.  Why You Should Not Use Drano Many people associate drain clogs with Drano or other products that have toxic chemicals that are supposed to clear or prevent clogs. Plumbers, in general, do not suggest using these caustic and harsh chemicals, since they can cause damage to the pipes and fittings in the house. Drano also joins waste-water and will end up in rivers and streams, causing harm to the environment. Furthermore, if a plumber is working on a

How to Use a Snake to Unclog a Drain

Whether you are using your bathroom sink, kitchen sink, or ready to feel the hot water hit you as you take a shower, whenever there is a blockage and you have a clogged drain, life can feel like it stops, until that backup is cleared and the drain opening is restored.  Often, the best way to deal with stubborn clogs is to prevent them from happening at all. There are many DIY drain cleaning tricks homeowners use, from baking soda, vinegar, drain cleaner to corkscrews and other items to keep the build up to a minimum, for floor drains, main drains, shower drains, bathtub drains, sink drains, drain pipes, p-traps and more.  If you are past being able to prevent a clogged drain, however, there are a number of options and tools at your disposal. The most common being a plunger and drain snakes. While cleaning and plunging can often

What to Do When There is Standing Water in the Washing Machine

If the Water is Staying in the Washing Machine Does the water sit in the machine after your load has finished and the water level doesn’t go down, or do you have a slow water flow when draining? The issue probably lies with the washer. This problem could be traced to the drain tube (which comes out of the machine), the lid switch or the drain pump (an internal issue).  There are generally 2 types of washing machines: front load washer and top-loading washing machines. Both of these will attach to washing machine drain pipes, and both the top and front loader washing machines can be susceptible to kinks or a blockage in the drain hose, or a clog in the drain line. Troubleshooting this is simple enough and with a little know how you can determine the cause of the problem. Use pliers to squeeze the spring fitting or

Common Commercial Plumbing Problems

Whether you’re a business owner or a manager, there’s one thing you know for sure: You can’t afford to have plumbing “problems.” After all, time is money! When it comes to preventing toilet clogs and leaky faucets at home, you’re probably pretty good at maintaining your plumbing, but when it comes to controlling how employees, customers, and visitors take care of the plumbing in your building – not so easy. Whether you’re running a small business, a retail store, or an office building, you need the plumbing to work smoothly. If you’ve been at it a while, you already know that plumbing problems are inevitable. Aside from mentioning “proper plumbing maintenance” in an employee meeting, there’s not much you can do about what people flush down the toilet, but that doesn’t mean the situation is a hopeless one. There are still some practical things that you can do as a

Preventing a Plumbing Emergency Over the Holidays

If you will be entertaining over the holidays the last thing you want is for a plumbing disaster to strike, and we all know that emergencies always happen at the worst times – like when we have a house full of guests! Whether the issue is a toy car clogging the toilet, turkey grease solidifying in the kitchen drain, silverware jamming the garbage disposal, or a broken water heater on Christmas Eve, plumbers are the superheroes over the holidays, that’s for sure! Many households see an increase in activity between November 23rd and January 1st, which places additional stress on the water heater, dishwasher, showers, bathtubs, toilets, kitchen sink drain, garbage disposal, and even the washing machine, which means household plumbing is put the ultimate test. While you can put in an emergency call to a plumber over the holidays, you’d prefer not to have to place a call on

Buying a New Home: Plumbing Inspections

Are you buying a new home? When we say “new,” we’re not necessarily talking about a brand new home, but new to you. If you put an offer in on a house, you’re going to order a home inspection and depending on where you live, possibly a termite inspection. But, what about the plumbing, have you put much thought into that? Home buyers need to know all of what they’re getting into or they may end up in hot water. Let’s say you found your dream home. It’s been a rental for the last 20 years, but you don’t mind. The owners recently re-painted the whole house from the inside out, and they installed new carpets. You’re ready to make an offer and seal the deal, assuming the inspection goes well. The general contractor who moonlights as a home inspector, or the inspection service recommended by the real estate agent,

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“Chuck arrived within 30 minutes on a Sunday and was extremely professional and curtious. I’ve been using A-1 annually for 10 years now to clean roots out of my main and the price is always fair and the staff always top notch. Just wanted to say thanks again to Chuck.”

Kris S.

“Hired them to clean out tree roots from main line. Were on time and did a great job. Have used them before and never been disappointed.”

LeVera Howard

“A-1 was excellent! I recommend them to all. Chuck was so great to work with and gave us really great advice to keep our pipes clean. Thank you!”

Shereen McClellan North

“A-1 is the best for sewer & septic issues! They’re responsive, quick and so helpful! We had a main line issue and that night our kitchen sink backed up. They had the same service tech out the next morning. Very professional and reliable. We’ve never had anything but amazing service from A-1!”

Jenny Miskell McLellan